Setting up local step debugging with Zend Studio

Setting up debugging in an IDE with a local PHP development environment has gotten so easy it can be done in a couple automated steps. In this post I will demonstrate how to get step debugging functioning with Zend Studio and Zend Debugger when the server is set up on a local environment.

To begin with, I had the following:

  • Local installation of Zend Server 8.5.+ (basic LAMP stack, but with Zend Debugger included in the Zend Server installation). Alternatively I could have had a vanilla LAMP environment with Xdebug.
  • Ensure that Z-Ray is active in the Zend Server settings.
  • A local project set up on Zend Studio, without the server set up in the Zend Studio project configuration. (in this example I have a Zend Expressive Skeleton ready)
  • The local project set up as an Apache virtualhost.

Ensure Zend Studio is running with the project we will debug open.

In a browser with the application rendered I click the debug icon in the Z-Ray toolbar at the foot of the window, and select the desired debugging action.

This will cause Zend Studio to prompt if we desire to use the Debug Perspective after it receives the debug connection from Zend Debugger. In most cases we can simply click Yes and let things happen normally.

That’s about it, we are debugging!

Closing

This was a very simplistic local development environment setup. We didn’t have a firewall to contend with, and the server was set up locally rather than inside a virtual machine. I have other posts, linked below, to help with some of these alternative setups.

Happy Debugging!

Other posts on Debugging you may find helpful:

Setting up local step debugging with PhpStorm

Setting up PHP debugging in an IDE with a local development environment has gotten so easy it can be done in a few automated steps. In this post I will demonstrate how to get step debugging functioning with PhpStorm and Zend Debugger when the server is set up on a local environment.

To begin with, I had the following:

  • Local installation of Zend Server 8.5.+ (basic LAMP stack, but with Zend Debugger included in the Zend Server installation). Alternatively I could have had a vanilla LAMP environment with Xdebug.
  • Ensure that Z-Ray is active in the Zend Server settings.
  • A local project set up on PhpStorm, without the server set up in the PhpStorm project configuration. (in this example I have a Zend Expressive Skeleton ready)
  • The local project set up as an Apache virtualhost.

With the project open in PhpStorm I click the icon to inform the IDE to start listening for debugging sessions. (Usually in the upper right corner, looks like a telephone receiver with a red indicator that it is not listening, and turns green when you click it)

Then a browser with the application rendered I click the debug icon in the Z-Ray toolbar at the foot of the window, and select the desired debugging action.

This will cause PhpStorm to prompt after it receives the debug connection from Zend Debugger. In most cases we can simply click Accept and let things happen normally.

That’s about it, we are debugging!

Behind the scenes, PhpStorm created a site and associated it with the project.

Of course we could have created the server ahead of time and not be prompted to Accept the incoming connection, but what is the fun in that?

Closing

This was a very simplistic local development environment setup. We didn’t have a firewall to contend with, and the server was set up locally rather than inside a virtual machine. I have other posts, linked below, to help with some of these alternative setups.

Happy Debugging!

Other posts on Debugging you may find helpful:

PHPMyAdmin blank whitescreen (414 Request-URI Too Long)

Ran across an interesting issue where PhpMyAdmin on a newly installed CentOS server was not rendering in a browser. Or more accurately, it was rendering but the CSS kicked in and caused the browser to display a blank page rather than the desired login screen. (Doing a View Source on the page showed that the login form was in fact there, but hidden by CSS.)

After checking the obvious things: PHP running (with error reporting on), file permissions, Apache working, VirtualHost definition correct, I was stuck. There were no indications of a problem, and PHP reported nothing. (Because, as we will see, there were no errors to be displayed…or was there?)

Finally, I turned on Firebug and refreshed the page. Voilà! There were actually two issues, but they were hidden within additional calls in the backend:

Screenshot from 2016-05-05 17-29-03

Wow, those two long URL strings! One URL was:

https://{domain-withheld}/phpmyadmin/js/get_scripts.js.php?scripts%5B%5D=jquery/jquery-2.1.4.min.js&scripts%5B%5D=sprintf.js&scripts%5B%5D=ajax.js&scripts%5B%5D=keyhandler.js&scripts%5B%5D=jquery/jquery-ui-1.11.4.min.js&scripts%5B%5D=jquery/jquery.cookie.js&scripts%5B%5D=jquery/jquery.mousewheel.js&scripts%5B%5D=jquery/jquery.event.drag-2.2.js&scripts%5B%5D=jquery/jquery-ui-timepicker-addon.js&scripts%5B%5D=jquery/jquery.ba-hashchange-1.3.js&scripts%5B%5D=jquery/jquery.debounce-1.0.5.js&scripts%5B%5D=menu-resizer.js&scripts%5B%5D=cross_framing_protection.js&scripts%5B%5D=rte.js&scripts%5B%5D=tracekit/tracekit.js&scripts%5B%5D=error_report.js&scripts%5B%5D=config.js&scripts%5B%5D=doclinks.js&scripts%5B%5D=functions.js&scripts%5B%5D=navigation.js&v=4.6.1

A quick search uncovered a possible fix. The default Apache limit of the request line needed to be made longer to accomodate PhpMyAdmin. Doing this was simple. I added the directive to ‘/etc/httpd/conf/httpd.conf’ like so:

LimitRequestLine 800

I tried a few different lengths and found that 700 was too short, but 800 worked fine. Also, though I simply added this to the conf file, according to the docs you can add this within the VirtualHost rather than making it blanket covering the entire server.

Hope this helps others.

Ubuntu 16.04 and PHP 7 not rendering

After reloading my work laptop with Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (I prefer to do a reload versus an upgrade, for each LTS version) I was very excited to install PHP 7, and installed using the standard Ubuntu repositories using typical commands:

$ sudo apt-get install apache2
$ sudo apt-get install php7.0

However, after doing the installs I discovered PHP scripts would not render in a browser. After a small amount of digging I realized that doing the base installs did not include one important piece. The package ‘libapache2-mod-php7.0’ was not automatically installed as expected, as it did in the past. (I don’t remember needing to install it separately in the past.) Hopefully the package maintainers fix this at some point. Your mileage may vary.

$ sudo apt-get install libapache2-mod-php7.0

So one quick install like shown previous and all is working fine.

Happy PHP’ing.

Using an SSH tunnel to step debug through a firewall

In a previous post I covered how to set up PHP step debugging in Zend Studio. But if that doesn’t work there may be a firewall in between the server and the debugging client, or IDE, preventing the connection. Here is a possible way to get around that.

Note: Of course there is no way to avoid the firewall, but this post assumes a connection to the server using SSH is possible. What we’ll do is allow communications from the server to the client using the Zend Studio default debugging port (10137) forwarded through an SSH tunnel which uses port 22 by default. For this to work an SSH connection must be possible from the client to the server.

While it is possible to do this using command line from Linux or Mac, or using PuTTY on Windows, this example will use the built-in SSH capabilities of Zend Studio 13. For older versions of Zend Studio I recommend using command line or PuTTY linked above.

Assuming step debugging in Zend Studio was already set up as outlined in my previous post we will continue using that setup, but enhance it with an SSH tunnel.

In Zend Studio open the preferences. (Windows|Preferences) With the preferences open, expand the PHP node to get to Servers. Highlight the server configuration to work with, and click Edit.

Screenshot from 2016-04-18 15:07:40

When the Edit Server dialog opens select the SSH Tunneling tab. Check the box to Enable SSH Tunneling, and populate the desired Username and Password. If your server requires the use of an SSH Private Key in order to login, please supply that.

Screenshot from 2016-04-18 14:41:34

Now that the SSH connection is set up we need to add the Port Forwarding for the debugging port. Do this by clicking the Add button in the Port Forwarding section.

Screenshot from 2016-04-18 14:43:45

Select ‘remote’ to specify which side of the tunnel will be sending communication on the forwarded port, enter the local address the remote side (server) will use and port number to send to. Then enter the port number on the receiving end (the client). Now click Finish to apply the setup, and click finish to exit the preferences.

In the PHP Servers view (Windows|Show View|PHP Servers) right-click the server we just added SSH Tunneling support to and select Open SSH Tunnel. You should then see a brief dialog letting you know the connection was made.

Screenshot from 2016-04-18 14:52:41

We are ready to debug!

Since I was using Zend Server in this example I have Z-Ray available, and while on a page I wished to debug I could simply click on the debug icon and select any of the debugging options.

Screenshot from 2016-04-03 15:24:13

This will cause Zend Debugger to contact Zend Studio for debugging, which in turn will ask the user if they wish to open the debugging perspective.

IMPORTANT NOTE: Debugging over an SSH tunnel is not fast. Therefore you may notice a lag between initiating the debug session and your IDE reacting. After that things speed up, but the initial connection is slow on many networks.

Screenshot from 2016-04-03 15:24:44

If Yes is selected the IDE is now ready to perform any debugging the user desires.

Screenshot from 2016-04-03 15:27:24

Happy debugging!!!

This post is one in a series on debugging. For others click below:

PhpStorm and debugging issue
Setting up step debugging in Zend Studio
Setting up local debugging with PhpStorm