Zend Server and Sendmail failure bug

While trying to test the sendmail feature of Zend Server 6.3, on Ubuntu and CentOS, there was a bug.  I discovered that utilizing the Mail Preferences area of the Adminitration->Settings page and sending a test email to myself with the Sendmail option ended in an “Unknown error”.

The error returned by Zend Framework 2, which is used by Zend Server 6 was a generic error (Unknown error) if Sendmail returned an error status, but an empty error message.  Not much help, or was it?

Since the error appeared to be caused by Sendmail not returning a proper error the search for the issue led there.  See where my logic was going? My next step was to test sending an email with the PHP mail() function, and see if that shed any light on the issue.  Unfortunately it worked, which meant the issue was elsewhere.  But if the error wasn’t with PHP, Apache, Sendmail, Zend Server, or Zend Framework, where could it be?

At this point I enlisted one of my coworkers, Roman Basayev, who nailed it down.

Of course!  Zend Server on Linux installs Lighttpd for the Zend Server gui, and there must be a setting there for using Sendmail.  Sure enough in the file ‘/usr/local/zend/gui/lighttpd/etc/php-fcgi.ini’ there is a setting for ‘sendmail_path’ and it was empty.  So PHP running on Lighttpd was not able to find Sendmail, and therefore was not getting a decent error message.

The fix:

In the file ‘/usr/local/zend/gui/lighttpd/etc/php-fcgi.ini’ update the ‘sendmail_path’ to be ‘/usr/sbin/sendmail -ti’.  These are the paths on Ubuntu and CentOS, others may vary.

sendmail_path = "/usr/sbin/sendmail -ti"

After restarting Zend Server, all should be good  to go now.

CentOS networking not active after installation

I needed to install a CentOS 6.4 server in a VM and after installing I was not able to hit anything on the Internet, or any network for that matter.  When I tried using the yum packages manager I received the error “Couldn’t resolve host ‘mirrorlist.centos.org…” and I was at a loss on what to do next.  I was not able to ping anything.

This led me to look into the networking and and upon opening the /etc/resolv.conf I found it totally empty.  So I then opened /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/ifcfg-eth0 and found the issue.  The line “ONBOOT” was set to “no”.

The complete file /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/ifcfg-eth0 after I altered it: (NOTE: the only thing I altered was the ONBOOT flag.)

DEVICE=eth0
HWADDR=09:00:27:D7:61:8D
TYPE=Ethernet
UUID=q93perfj-earf-ewrf-wqer-546877145475
ONBOOT=yes
NM_CONTROLLED=yes
BOOTPROTO=dhcp

After changing “ONBOOT” to “yes”, then rebooted for the configuration to take effect, all is good now.  I probably could have simply done a networking restart, but reboot on a fresh system was pretty fast.

Skype sounds audio distorted in Ubuntu

Now that I have Skype installed on Ubuntu 13.04 I discovered that the various Skype sounds were distorted.  It was almost like the sounds had some static mixed in with them.  I thought it was probably just a problem with the new version of Skype, or the new sound drivers.  However, I made a discovery that fixed the issue.

I tried the AlsaMixer fix, but it didn’t work. (A reboot simply resets the PCM to 100 again, and the sound is still crackly.)  So it all came down to a simple file edit to get it fixed.

Edit the file /etc/pulse/default.pa using the command:

sudo gedit /etc/pulse/default.pa

Add the following to the end of the line shown:

pulse audio file

So after adding “tsched=0” to the end of the line “load-module module-udev-detect” you will be all set.  After a reboot the sounds is still good.

Enjoy!  Hope it works for you.

Skype for Ubuntu 13.04 Ringtail

I am running the new version of Ubuntu 13.04 Raring Ringtail, and so far really like it.  However I’ve had a bit of trouble with Skype, because I could not get it to use the indicator area of the tray.  Other than that it seemed to work fine.

When I installed Skype I did it from the Skype website, and didn’t realize there was a package at http://archive.canonical.com/ partners already carrying it because that repository is not turned on by default for Aptitude.

The repository can be activated by either command line, or by using the Software & Updates which enable it for command line or Ubuntu Software Center, or Synaptic Package Manager.

Via terminal:

sudo add-apt-repository "deb http://archive.canonical.com/ $(lsb_release -sc) partner"
sudo apt-get update

Via GUI:

Open the System Settings and click on the Software & Updates icon, or using the Dash you can simply type “Software & Updates”.  Once it opens you can select the “Other Software” tab and check the first box titled Canonical Partners.

Software and Updates

Now we are able to install Skype from the Canonical Partners repository no matter what method you wish to use.

Install Methods:

From terminal

sudo apt-get install skype

Or search for it through Ubuntu Software Center or Synaptic Package Manager and install nromally.

It will install some other required packages with it, but after the install it now works as expected with the indicator and all.

Enjoy!

Saving a read-only file edited in vi / vim

We’ve all done it…opened a file using vi or vim to inspect the contents, and realize we need to alter it.  Of course we totally ignored the message informing we didn’t have permission to edit, so we’re only allowed to view it as “read-only”.  Then after we find the troublesome spot we hit “i” and happily edit the place needing changed, only to “face-palm” when we realize we cannot save the wonderful edit we just made.

In the past I handled this one of three ways: I either copied and pasted the change after reopening the file using sudo, or I reopened and retyped everything once again, or I save the file as a temp file and then rename it using sudo.  Very stupid, stressful and time consuming.

However, now I know a better way.  Using a combination of ‘tee’ and ‘sudo’ commands I can now save the read-only file rather than jumping through the hoops in the previous paragraph.  Here is how:

Open a file as normal, forgetting to use “sudo”, and therefore viewing a read-only file.
001-b_open_read_only

Then mistakenly try to edit the read-only file in the traditional manner.
002-b_insert-in-readonly-file

But when we try to save using ‘:w!’, SHIFT+ZZ, or :qw!, or whatever combination we normally fail with as an alternative.  Here is sample output of what we see:
003-b_try-to-save

At this point is where the new magic can happen. Instead of the normal “face-palm” we do not “ENTER” and move on. We can enter a new command and successfully save the file after entering the sudo password:
005-b_sudo-password

At this point we will be presented with the content of the file and a prompt to press ENTER or type another command. To simply save the file and move on we just press ENTER, and then press the letter “O” (oh). (NOTE: “L” seems to do pretty much the same thing.)  The file will be saved but remains open in vi/vim for more editing or reading.  We can now exit normally by typing “:q!” since the file is still open as “read-only”.
006-b_final-save

What the command does:

  • :w = Write a file.
  • !sudo = Call shell sudo command.
  • tee = The output of the vi/vim write command is redirected using tee.
  • % = Triggers the use of the current filename.
  • Simply put, the ‘tee’ command is run as sudo and follows the vi/vim command on the current filename given.