Skype for Ubuntu 13.04 Ringtail

I am running the new version of Ubuntu 13.04 Raring Ringtail, and so far really like it.  However I’ve had a bit of trouble with Skype, because I could not get it to use the indicator area of the tray.  Other than that it seemed to work fine.

When I installed Skype I did it from the Skype website, and didn’t realize there was a package at http://archive.canonical.com/ partners already carrying it because that repository is not turned on by default for Aptitude.

The repository can be activated by either command line, or by using the Software & Updates which enable it for command line or Ubuntu Software Center, or Synaptic Package Manager.

Via terminal:

sudo add-apt-repository "deb http://archive.canonical.com/ $(lsb_release -sc) partner"
sudo apt-get update

Via GUI:

Open the System Settings and click on the Software & Updates icon, or using the Dash you can simply type “Software & Updates”.  Once it opens you can select the “Other Software” tab and check the first box titled Canonical Partners.

Software and Updates

Now we are able to install Skype from the Canonical Partners repository no matter what method you wish to use.

Install Methods:

From terminal

sudo apt-get install skype

Or search for it through Ubuntu Software Center or Synaptic Package Manager and install nromally.

It will install some other required packages with it, but after the install it now works as expected with the indicator and all.

Enjoy!

Saving a read-only file edited in vi / vim

We’ve all done it…opened a file using vi or vim to inspect the contents, and realize we need to alter it.  Of course we totally ignored the message informing we didn’t have permission to edit, so we’re only allowed to view it as “read-only”.  Then after we find the troublesome spot we hit “i” and happily edit the place needing changed, only to “face-palm” when we realize we cannot save the wonderful edit we just made.

In the past I handled this one of three ways: I either copied and pasted the change after reopening the file using sudo, or I reopened and retyped everything once again, or I save the file as a temp file and then rename it using sudo.  Very stupid, stressful and time consuming.

However, now I know a better way.  Using a combination of ‘tee’ and ‘sudo’ commands I can now save the read-only file rather than jumping through the hoops in the previous paragraph.  Here is how:

Open a file as normal, forgetting to use “sudo”, and therefore viewing a read-only file.
001-b_open_read_only

Then mistakenly try to edit the read-only file in the traditional manner.
002-b_insert-in-readonly-file

But when we try to save using ‘:w!’, SHIFT+ZZ, or :qw!, or whatever combination we normally fail with as an alternative.  Here is sample output of what we see:
003-b_try-to-save

At this point is where the new magic can happen. Instead of the normal “face-palm” we do not “ENTER” and move on. We can enter a new command and successfully save the file after entering the sudo password:
005-b_sudo-password

At this point we will be presented with the content of the file and a prompt to press ENTER or type another command. To simply save the file and move on we just press ENTER, and then press the letter “O” (oh). (NOTE: “L” seems to do pretty much the same thing.)  The file will be saved but remains open in vi/vim for more editing or reading.  We can now exit normally by typing “:q!” since the file is still open as “read-only”.
006-b_final-save

What the command does:

  • :w = Write a file.
  • !sudo = Call shell sudo command.
  • tee = The output of the vi/vim write command is redirected using tee.
  • % = Triggers the use of the current filename.
  • Simply put, the ‘tee’ command is run as sudo and follows the vi/vim command on the current filename given.

My experience at Code Retreat Miami 2012

This past weekend (Dec. 8th, 2013) I had the great opportunity to experience my first Code Retreat in Miami, for the Global Day of Code Retreat, here is a post about it to help inform others about this wonderful event.  If you have a chance in the future to get to one, it is a “must do”.

The Crowd

I was very surprised there was a large group of Rails developers, and it was nice to see there were a few PHP people from the South Florida PHP Users Group (SoFloPHP) because I had posted the event on the group page.  It’s comical how the Rails folks (I do not refer to them as Ruby developers, because generally they do not know Ruby.) seem to feel their framework makes it the best tool for everything, and completely disregard every other language and framework on the planet to blindly evangelize.  I say “blindly” because Rails users seem to feel the need to push the framework on me by selling wonderful features, as if no other language/framework in the world has it.  (But I digress, that is another subject for another post.)

It was nice to see all of the programming languages represented.  There was PHP, Ruby on Rails, Java, Smalltalk, C#, and even some Python.  This made for a nice mix to view other languages, and how developers of those languages operate.

Overall everyone was friendly and it made for a great day of learning and fun.

What is Code Retreat?

Code Retreat is a single day pair-programming workshop giving a chance to practice Test Driven Development (TDD) while trying to solve a pretty challenging sample application, and follow the 4 rules of simple design.  The sample application is to build Conway’s Game of Life.  I will not try to explain the Game of Life here, so if you are curious you can click the link and learn of it on your own.

For many, the sample application is not an easy one to grasp. I found that all of my pairs kept trying to pre-define the game board size at the beginning of the process, though one of the criteria of the game is to have infinite size. (Even the moderator seemed to be stuck on the concept as well, and claimed that predefining a size was OK, because it is how he did it.  I found this disturbing, but overlooked it.)

Others found that forcing ourselves to write the tests first (TDD) was the hardest part of the event, and that is what it was all about.  The event is all about learning TDD, so it was justifiable that it was the challenging part.  I, for one, was up for the challenge and forced myself to NOT WRITE A SINGLE LINE OF CODE WITHOUT A TEST WRITTEN FIRST TO COVER IT.  Because of this I had 100% code coverage the entire day.

The day is broken down into 45 minute sessions where pairs work together and get as far as they can.  Usually the first 5 minutes are spent as each member of the pair explains how they envision the logic to work out.  Following that the initial tests are built to test the game board, then code is written to satisfy the tests.  Then more tests to populate the board, then more code to satisfy tests.  Then tests to makes sure the 4 rules of the game work, then code to carry them out.  Finally, if you got this far, tests to ensure a new turn is executed, and code to satisfy the test.

One of the parts of the interesting parts of the challenge is that prior to each 45 minutes pairing session the pairs were changed.  Which required that the pairs started over by explaining their vision.  Then at the end of each 45 minute session ALL code was deleted to ensure you start from scratch again.  This included any hand-written notes you took during previous pairings.

Of course, due to the 45 minutes restriction I don’t believe that anyone could truly get the completed application running.  But that is OK.  The purpose of the event is achieved by showing the benefits of pair-programming, using TDD (Test Driven Development), and bringing the various communities together.

Additional requirements

In addition to the rules and steps defined above, there was additional criteria placed upon the teams for each iteration.  The first round had no additional criteria, but each additional round carried a new requirement to follow.  For this event we had the following criteria set for each round respectively:

  1. Team with someone using a different programming language.
  2. 5 lines or less per method/function.
  3. No usage of mouse.  All keyboard shortcuts.
  4. No talking.

The additional requirements made it fun and forced attendees out of their comfort zone, in most cases.  It was interesting to see how, when faced with the difficulties of the additional requirements, it brought the pairs closer together to tackle the obstacle.

Possible Tweaks

While I did find the event awesome, and enabled developers from across the board to experience new things, I would love to do such an event where everyone used the same technologies.  This would enable to see how other developers in our own area of expertise have adjusted their workflow, and allow further learning.

By having a group using the same technologies it would allow juniors and seniors to learn from each other and grow the individual communities.

My Take-away

For me this was an awesome way to force myself to use TDD to develop.  Too often I get in a hurry and just skip right to the code, then come back and write tests later…maybe.  However, I found that by writing tests first during this event I actually got more coding done and ended up with less code overall.  And it also led me to do less back and forth refactoring during coding, that is normally a HUGE time waster.

I also found that pair-programming was very enjoyable, and led to time savings.  The person at the keyboard tended to get more done while the second person was free to think a bit more, rather than being occupied with the manual tasks of writing the code.

In Closing

I enjoyed the event thoroughly, and would love to do it again….today!  If you get a chance to attend one of these events in the future, I highly recommend it.

Add items to Ubuntu 12.04 Unity Launcher (quicklaunch)

The recent upgrade to Ubuntu 12.04 Precise Pangolin left me somewhat hanging when it comes to creating launchers on the desktop, and also in the Unity Launcher (also called quicklaunch in some places) for Zend Studio and PHPStorm. In Gnome prior to Unity in Ubuntu it was easy to right click the desktop and select Create Launcher to create icons on the desktop to launch applications or scripts, but in 12.04 that options is gone. So here is how I solved some of the issues.

I will cover adding Eclipse to the launcher, adding Zend Studio to the launcher, and PHPStorm to the launcher.

Method 1 (easiest)

For Netbeans and Eclipse based editors like Zend Studio or Aptana it is not too bad. I created a {name}.desktop files for each one and put it in the /home/{username}/.local/share/applications/ directory. Here is how I created a zendstudio.desktop file:

Note: If you want this option to be available for all users you can alternatively create the file in the /usr/share/applications/ directory, but that requires superuser permissions.

[Desktop Entry]
Version=1.0
Name=Zend Studio
Comment=PHP IDE for PHP development
Type=Application
Categories=Development;IDE;
Exec=/home/{username}/Zend/ZendStudio/ZendStudio
Terminal=false
StartupNotify=true
Icon=/home/{username}/Zend/ZendStudio/icon.xpm
Name[en_US]=Zend Studio

After creating the file above I rebooted. Following the reboot I was able to click the Unity Dash Home button, type “Zend” in the search field, then drag and drop the Zend Studio icon to the launcher where I wanted it to be. Now the application stays in the Unity Launcher.

For PHPStorm see method 3 below.

Method 2

Another method I found was to install the ‘gnome-panel’ package. (Actually it was already installed on my system for some reason.)

sudo apt-get install --no-install-recommends gnome-panel

With the gnome-panel I was now able to create a launcher on the desktop using the command below.

gnome-desktop-item-edit ~/Desktop/ --create-new

In the create launcher dialog I filled it out as follows:
Type: Application
Name: PhpStorm
Command: /bin/bash /home/username/PhpStorm/PhpStorm-117.257/bin/phpstorm.sh

NOTE: You could use /bin/sh or whatever shell you use. I use bash so that is why I put /bin/bash.

To create a shortcut in the Unity Launcher I double clicked the new desktop launcher I created above. (NOTE: If you start PHPStorm by executing the phpstorm.sh you do not get any options at all when right clicking the icon in the Unity Launcher.) Then when PHPStorm was running I was then able to right click on the icon in the Unity Launcher and selected “Lock to Launcher”. Voila! Now I have phpstorm on the Unity Launcher.

Method 3

This option is built right into PHPStorm. The wonderful people at JetBrains created a handy item in Tools to automatically create a menu item for you. Simply click on Tools->Create Desktop entry…and now you can Lock to Launcher the next time you run it. Start the JetBrains PhpStorm IDE from the Unity Dash you can then right click on the icon that shows up in the Unity Launcher and select “Lock to Launcher”. The icon now stays there, even after a reboot/logout.

Update:

Method 4

See comment to this post below by Shinybird on using Ubuntu Tweak. (Not sure if it works, but it sounds good.)

Enjoy!!!

Collect hardware info in Ubuntu

I had some trouble installing/upgrading my system to Ubuntu Precise 12.04, so I reported the bug and wanted to also provide my hardware info with the bug report. I found 2 commands that returned slightly different results about my hardware, but both had usable info.

The best seemed to be:

sudo lshw

Another I came across was:

sudo dmidecode

I hope this helps others.